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Twyman
de Chandler, comté de Gaspé, Québec
      

                 Il est difficile de trouver le pays d’origine de nos ancêtres. On mentionne l’Irlande à plusieurs endroits, mais quand on cherche le nom en Irlande, depuis le  recensement du début  des années 1800, on trouve des Tyman, Timmen…. Mais aucun  toyman ou thoyman qui ressemblerait à Twyman.

             J’ai trouvé ce site, ( en anglais ) qui explique l’origine du nom.


1   The first of these theories is one of a spelling mutation, with the Twyman surname being a metathesized form of a similar surname.  To explain, within Hampshire there is a town now known as Christchurch.  However in the past this town has been known as Twinham. This has over the years lent itself to what is known a relatively uncommon surname deriving from the place name...the Twynam surname, which differentiates itself visually from the more common Twyman spelling simply in the respect that the N and the M have switched places.  There is also a theory that is pretty much the same as this, only differing in the respect that the origins of the name can be found in the town of Twinehame is Sussex and that the Twynam surname had developed in the same way as seen in Hampshire.

2    The second theory is simply one of language, based on the theory that the similiar Twyford surname reportedly has connections with area in which the town's     river had been bridged twice in that area.  The theory goes along the lines that the surname connects to the Twymen...or two men.  Perhaps indicating a set of brothers, most likely involved in trading in a given area.  This at least would be supported by the fact that the earliest Twymans in Kent can be found in the costal ports in Thanet.

3   The third theory builds on the previous, and I believe is at least slightly more plausible.  The suggestion is that the Twyman surname derives from the Old English word "teowingmann", which was often the name given to the chief man of a tithing.

4   The fourth, and I believe most interesting, theory picks up from this connection to the woollen trade.  It is of note that involvement in the woollen trade was remarkably common amongst settlers from continental Europe around the 16th century, which is when you see some of the earliest known Twymans in Kent.  At the time there was certainly a great influx of settlers in England, fleeing religious persecution in Europe due to the conflict between the Catholic status quo and the newly developing Protestantism.  Interestingly, a lot of family stories that have been reported in the course of my research have maintained a connection between the Twymans and what is now Belgium and the Netherlands, and it is perhaps noticeable that some of the earliest appearances of something resembling Twyman is the parish registers in Kent read as "Twimà" and/or "Thwÿman".

5    What is also interesting to note is that the areas which even today show the highest population densities for the Twyman surname are those of the Isle of Thanet and the Isle of Wight in Hampshire.  The historical interest therein comes in the fact that back at the time of the influx of the Anglo-Saxon people's into England, these areas were predominately occupied by the Jutes.

Whichever of the theories is true, the suggestion seems to be that
while Kent may today house the vast majority of the Twymans in the country, the family has it's roots elsewhere.  Whether those roots are to be found in Europe or closer to home in Hampshire is a matter of conjecture at this time, but one thing is certain the Isle of Thanet as it was then would have provided an ideal settling point.  Situated relatively close to Europe and with ports on both the English Channel and the now silted-up Wansum Channel, the potential for emigration and a life of trade was there.
If one thing is certain its that more research is needed before a definitive answer can be given, and in future I hope to updating this article to reflect the new developments in the understanding of the origins of all Twyman branches.

<http://myweb.tiscali.co.uk/patriadomus/tons/origins.htm>

Origine du nom.
Angleterre et Thanet
Répartition du nom "Twyman",
en Angleterre


Voici un courriel, reçu de Tiscali, à la suite d'une demande de ma part.
Hi.
Many thanks for your email. I'm guessing you'd be related to the John Twyman who was born in New Brunswick around 1818? I've seen notes of his father (Robert Twyman) being from Ireland, although haven't really come across much to connect him to any family over in Ireland as yet. There were remarkably few Twymans in Ireland (I only have 17 Twymans born in Ireland in my files), and the vast majority of those are children of soldiers in the army...so I do wonder if this was the case with Robert.
Of potential interest, though, I do have a note of a Simon Twyman who was born in Ireland around 1817, who was living in Ontario in 1851. Very tenuous, but perhaps there's a remote connection with Robert above.
I shall look into things, and will get back to you once I have something of more substance.
Many thanks.
Simon


http://myweb.tiscali.co.uk/patriadomus/tons/origins.htm
Les photos, dans cet onglet,
sont d'Irlande ou de la Gaspésie.
Il semble, que notre sang irlandais, nous viendrait plus de nos grand-mères
( Leveston et Wall) que de notre ancêtre Robert Twyman.
La recherche continue.
Contact:  twywilk@twyman.ca